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Statistics
Monthly Calls
MonthFireEMS
Jan4475
Feb4383
Mar4970
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Total136228
 
Fire Top Ten
Responder
NameCalls
Asst Chief Jason Tarbell64
Chief Will Rosenberg62
Jayden Edwards37
Sgt John Hefner 32
Capt Jon Martin31
Lt Andrew Selig24
Dave Williams22
Matt Barlow21
Kevin Jones20
Zach Hopkins20
 
EMS Top Ten Responder
NameCalls
Dave Williams30
Mike Kalck28
Brian Leschke26
Jayden Edwards16
Joe Fellner16
Andrew Ward19
Will Brush11
Mike Hayden11
Matt Barlow9
Eamon Shifflet9
 

SPRING FIRE SAFETY TIPS

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 

     Spring-cleaning is an annual ritual for many people.  Just as the first signs of spring appear to usher in a new season, our spring-cleaning habits signify a fresh start for us after the long winter months.  The FVFAC and State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci suggest that Spring-cleaning can take on another meaning. “It's the ideal time to check our homes, porches, garages, sheds and yards for dangerous materials and unsafe conditions and to spend some quality time to protect our families and properties.”

     Start by taking a few minutes to plan your safety clean up day.  You will want to check each room in your home, including the attic and basement.  Also, don't forget the garage, yard and storage shed.

     Plan to do several different things:

     1.  Remove All Hazards:

              Check and correct things such as:

                      Frayed or damaged appliance cords, wiring, fuses or breakers.

                      Piles of rubbish, trash and yard debris.

                      Remove stacks of paper and magazines and place them in recycling containers.

                      Check for water leaks, especially near electrical appliances.

                      Check for adequate clearance between heating appliances and     combustibles.                                              

     2.  Properly Store Flammable Liquids and Home Chemicals:

                      Make sure that gasoline and cleaning fluids are well marked and are out of the reach of children and pets. Store in a cool, dry place outside the house.

                      Clean up work areas. Put dangerous tools, adhesives, matches or other work items away and out of any child's reach.

                      Make sure that all chemicals are kept under lock and key and out of reach of children and pets.

     3.  Check Fire Protection and Safety Equipment:

                     Test your smoke alarms and CO detectors.  Do It Now while you are thinking about it

                     Make sure all doors and windows open easily and are accessible for fast escapes.

                     Make sure your street numbers are posted properly and are clearly visible.

                     Check and make sure you have a working flashlight and battery-powered radio for the approaching storm season.

     4.  Plan Your Escape:

                     Sit down with your family and make sure that everyone knows what to do in the event of a fire by designing a home escape plan.

                     Make sure you have two ways out of every room and that you have a meeting place outside the home for the whole family.

                     Practice the plan at least twice a year.  Even the best plan is not any good if you don't take time to practice it!

     5.   Remove Outdoor Debris:

                     Clear away dead leaves and brush from the outside of walls of your home and other structures.

                     Eliminate clutter under decks, porches and stairs.

       6. Be Aware of Hazardous Weather Conditions:

                     Monitor social media outlets and NOAA Weather Radio for your area. Be aware of watches and warnings related to approaching storms and fire weather conditions.

     You can do a lot to protect yourself, your family and your property.  In fact, you are the key to your safety.  A little time spent on simple common sense prevention will do a lot to make your home a safer place to live! 

   


 

WHAT IS YOUR RESIDENTIAL FIRE SPRINKLER IQ?

Saturday, April 9, 2016               So, just how much do you know about how residential fire sprinklers work? There are a lot of myths out there! Do the smoke alarms turn on the sprinklers? Do all the sprinklers activate at once? The attached videos answer these and more questions to help educate citizens and dispel the misinformation that abounds regarding fire sprinkler systems.  

              After watching the videos feel free to contact your local fire department or the Office of the Maryland State Fire Marshal if you need additional information on residential fire sprinklers or other fire and life safety topics.

     


 

FVFAC RESPONDS TO SEVERAL AREA MVC'S

N. Tollgate Rd. 3/31/2016

N. Tollgate Rd. 3/31/2016

               The beginning of the spring season has seen members of Fallston Volunteer Fire and Ambulance Co. respond to approximately 14 reports of motor vehicle crashes with injury over the past two weeks throughout the greater Fallston area. While we can't say that the improved weather has any effect on our MVC call volume, it is apparent that something is distracting drivers and causing these crashes.

               The result of the crashes we responded to this month include several patient transports to trauma centers, two fatalities, and numerous other patients transported to local hospitals for treatment.

                The Officers and Members of the FVFAC urge all motorists to drive safely, as though your life depends on it! Distracted driving is dangerous! Vehicle operators must limit the electronic devices available to them when driving. Parents need to be sure that teenage drivers thoroughly understand the risks and hazards related to dangerous driving practices. All drivers need to drive defensively, all of the time in order to avoid potential crashes. The National Safety Council has a variety of driver safety programs available. Additional driver safety information can be found through AARP.  

For additional coverage of incidents see our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/FVFAC/

   


 

FVFAC PLACES NEW ENGINE 1312 IN SERVICE

Sunday, March 20, 2016             Chief Will Rosenberg and the Fallston Volunteer Fire and Ambulance Co. are pleased to place in service our new Engine 1312, a 2016 Pierce 1250 gallon per minute pumper with a 1000 gallon water tank. Engine 1312 carries all engine company equipment required by NFPA 1901 and Harford County Volunteer Fire and EMS Association standards. Engine 1312 will be housed at the Carrs Mill Road Station.

            The Officers and Members of the FVFAC would like to acknowledge the many hours of work performed by the Apparatus Committee which consisted of Randy Blevins, Jason Tarbell, Alex Pafel, Tim Nielsen, Michael Kalck, Mark Pilachowski, and Mike Seifert.

             The FVFAC extends an open invitation to members of the Fallston community to stop by the Carrs Mill Road Station to look at the new Engine 1312, meet your local Volunteer Fire and EMS responders, and see if joining our organization is in your future!   

             This new engine replaces a 1996 Spartan/Quality engine which is now in service at the Berkeley Springs (WV) Volunteer Fire Company.

   


 

CHANGE YOUR CLOCK ... CHANGE YOUR BATTERY !

          In anticipation of Daylight Savings Time (DST) beginning in the early morning hours of March 13th, the State Fire Marshal is urging Marylanders to “Change Your Clock – Change Your Battery” in both smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in their homes.  Recognizing that working smoke alarms and CO detectors double a family’s chance of surviving a home fire and/or unsafe carbon monoxide levels, the State Fire Marshal says Daylight Savings Time is a great opportunity for families to change the batteries.  “Please take the little time required to help ensure the safety of your family and friends by maintaining these early warning life saving devices.”

          A Maryland law became effective on July 1, 2013 involving “battery only” smoke alarms used in residential properties.  When these “battery only” smoke alarms have reached their 10-year life span, the smoke alarm is to be replaced with new long-life sealed lithium battery smoke alarms with silence/hush button features.  The silence/hush button feature temporarily disables the alarm so the occupant can ventilate the space from mild smoke conditions typically created during some cooking operations.  The use of these alarms also eliminates the need to replace the batteries during the 10 year life of the alarm. 

          The new law also requires homeowners to ensure they have a smoke alarm installed on each floor and outside sleeping areas, per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommendations.  It is recommended to place them in each bedroom as well.

          If your property is protected with 120 volt electric smoke alarms, they also should be replaced every 10 years with new 120 volt smoke alarms w/ battery back-up to ensure proper and timely operation in the event of a fire. 

          Along with working smoke alarms and CO detectors, Home Escape Plans are another way Marylanders can avoid injury or death in their homes.  By identifying at least two different escape routes, families can practice the plan together – before an emergency strikes.  Practicing the plan helps educate younger children to the danger of hazardous situations and the importance of recognizing that the sound of a smoke alarm or CO detector signals a potential hazard in the home. “Changing the battery in your smoke alarms and CO detectors, along with developing and practicing a home escape plan, are two of the best ways to protect your loved ones and yourself from fire and carbon monoxide poisoning,” stated Fire Marshal Geraci.

          A recent fire in the Upper Crossroads area illustrates the importance of having working smoke alarms in your home. The occupants of the home were alerted to the fire by the activation of smoke alarms and were able to safely evacuate the building.  www.fvfac.org/news/fullstory/newsid/226809



          Please observe the overhead electronic signs as you travel throughout the state this weekend.  The Office of the State Fire Marshal and all Marylanders thank the Maryland Department of Transportation and the State Highway Administration for assisting to spread the word about this life saving reminder.    

(The Office of the State Fire Marshal is an agency of the Department of State Police dedicated to helping protect citizens from fire and explosion through a comprehensive program of education, inspection, investigation and fire protection engineering.  For more information on fire safety call 1-800-525-3124, log onto our website at: Maryland State Fire Marshal and/or our Facebook Page.)



   


 

FVFAC RESPONDS TO UPPER CROSSROADS FIRE

                  At  1:15 P.M. Tuesday March 1 Fallston VFAC and surrounding volunteer fire companies were dispatched to a report of a dwelling fire in the 2600 block of Fallston RD. in the Upper Crossroads area. First arriving units from FVFAC reported heavy fire conditions involving the attached garage of a 2-story wood frame dwelling. Initially a transitional fire attack was implemented to diminish the large amount of fire involving the garage, moving to an interior fire attack to limit fire extension into and throughout the dwelling.  

                  Units from Fallston, Jarrettsville, Bel Air Volunteer Fire Companies in Harford County as well as Jacksonville, Hereford, and Kingsville Volunteer Fire Companies in Baltimore County were on the scene of the one alarm fire. A Tanker Strike Team was also requested due to the area not being served by public water (hydrants).

                   The occupants of the home were alerted to the fire by working smoke alarms and able to rapidly escape without injury.No injuries were reported to fire service personnel. The Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office was on the scene to investigate the cause and origin of the fire which was determined to be improper disposal of smoking materials. Damages are estimated to be $175,000.00. 

     
courtesy of Lisa Zimmerman

courtesy of Lisa Zimmerman

courtesy Matt Button-The Aegis

courtesy Matt Button-The Aegis



 

THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE FVFAC EXPRESS OUR SYMPATHY AND CONDOLENCES TO THE HARFORD COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE AS WELL AS THE FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF SENIOR DEPUTY PATRICK DAILEY AND SENIOR DEPUTY MARK LOGSDON

 

     
Sr. Deputy Patrick Dailey EOW 2/10/2016

Sr. Deputy Patrick Dailey EOW 2/10/2016

Sr. Deputy Mark Logsdon EOW 2/10/2016

Sr. Deputy Mark Logsdon EOW 2/10/2016



 

FVFAC BLIZZARD OPERATIONS- JANUARY 23-24

             The FVFAC along with the other member companies of the Harford County Volunteer Fire and EMS Association staffed our stations and equipment beginning Friday January 22 in preparation for the record breaking blizzard that moved through the region. FVFAC members, as well as HCVFEMSA EMS Foundation employees, and Maryland National Guard personnel have been at our stations throughout this event and remain on duty as we enter the recovery phase of the operation.

              FVFAC units were dispatched to approximately a dozen emergency fire and EMS calls during the storm. Utilizing a pre-planned response policy the appropriate four wheel drive units equipped with a winch, plow, and other equipment responded to assist fire and EMS units as needed.

               As we move through the recovery phase of the event please heed the warnings that our emergency response partners have been providing. These may be found on the following Facebook pages: FVFAC-  https://www.facebook.com/FVFAC/?fref=ts  ,  Maryland Emergency Management Agency- https://www.facebook.com/MDMEMA/?fref=ts , and the Harford County Department of  Emergency Services-  https://www.facebook.com/HarfordCoEM/?fref=ts  .

                 

     
Clearing the response driveway

Clearing the response driveway

Loading equipment on National Guard unit

Loading equipment on National Guard unit



 

FOR UPDATES ON BLIZZARD INFO AND SAFETY TIPS SEE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

FVFAC facebook page link    https://www.facebook.com/FVFAC/?fref=ts

   


 

OPERATIONAL OFFICERS IN PLACE FOR 2016

           The FVFAC operational officers for 2016 are settling into their positions. Elections were held Monday January 4th and all necessary appointments were completed this past weekend. The list of officers includes: Chief of Department- Will Rosenberg; 1st Assistant Chief- Jason Tarbell; 2nd Assistant Chief- Timothy (Randy) Blevins; EMS Assistant Chief- Michael Kalck; Safety Officer- Timothy Holt; Fire Captains- Jon Martin, Steve Hull, Scott Blankenship; EMS Captains- Chris Aycock, Stacey Gail; Fire Lieutenants Amanda Puleio, Kevin Hartlove, Michael Siefert, Jonny Lewis, Andrew Selig; EMS Lieutenants- Lisa Rosenberg, John Richter; Fire Sergeants- Nick Stutleberg, John Hefner, Brian Leschke, Brandon Scalchunes; EMS Sergeant- Kris Walinski, Tiffany Jones, Jenna Streib, Becky Gibbons, Jenn Chenworth.  Congratulations to these officers! The future of the FVFAC is bright!

   


 
 
 

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